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20 Questions You Didn't Know You Wanted To Ask... Andy Cooper (The Allergies / Ugly Duckling)


How would you best describe what you do to the uninitiated?

 I'm a seasoned funk vagabond trying to keep my head above water. Since the mid-90's, I've produced and performed in groups (Ugly Duckling, The Allergies) while writing and composing music for TV shows, movies and even a musical. I'm a reasonably accomplished rapper and performer. I'm a mediocre musician.

Where would you say you are with regard to your career right now?

 I'm very happy at the moment. I really love working with The Allergies and I also have a great relationship with a licensing company called Audio Network which keeps me respectable. What I really love to do is create funky music and that's most of my job right now so how could I complain?

Which song (not neccesarilly yours) best sums you/the band up and why?

 I have a song called 'Chasing The Funk' which describes some of my emotions and experiences in a life where I attempt to hold on to an ever elusive music career. It's simple and to the point but it, for the most part, sums up my journey.

Who would you say has been your biggest inspiration (musically or otherwise)?

 Wow, that's tough. I'm really inspired by songwriters because composition is my favourite aspect of music and the thing at which I would most like to excel. There are too many to name: Irving Berlin, Bill Withers, the Gershwins, Billy Strayhorn, Lennon/McCartney...but my biggest hero might be Rod Temperton

Is there anyone amongst your influences that you think would surprise people and why?

 Probably all of them because most people will think I just listen to old rap stuff but I'm always trying to learn about different aspects of music (artistically, culturally, historically...)

What are you most proud of?

 Survival. It's not easy to make a living in this business and despite a relative lack of natural talent, I've managed to work in music since I was a young adult. Plus, I've been able to do it on my own terms and with my integrity (generally) in tact.

In the quest to get the music ‘out there’ have you ever done or agreed to anything you’ve later regretted?

 Yes, one time in particular but it wasn't so artistically awful as it was a decision that was made purely for money. I didn't want to do it but I was outvoted by the other members of my band (but I did take the money). Aside from that, I haven't gone outside the lines (at least the lines I have drawn) too much although there are a few tracks that I think we (Ugly Duckling) may have been trying a bit too hard to appeal to a larger audience. I'm not ashamed of those songs but I would leave them out of my portfolio.

What’s the most ridiculous request that’s been asked of you/the band?

 Someone asked Ugly Duckling to compose a musical and I actually took on the challenge (the other two didn't have any interest or inclination for theatre). After some years, the show 'Recorded In Hollywood' had two runs and earned respectable reviews from all the major publications in LA. I have been giggling ever since.

What do you think is the secret to a good working relationship amongst musicians?

 First off, common values and ethics with regard to musical tastes and career aspirations. After that, I believe it's key to be involved with people who believe in team work and cheer for the success of others. Regardless of how talented a self-centered person might be, they'll eventually corrupt the operation

If you could have played on one song (that you don’t), what would it be and why?

 Drums (i'm a semi-decent drummer) on James Brown 'Soul Power'. It's just a groove that could go on forever and I'd liked to have held it down.

How do you make the balance between music and personal responsibilities?

 I'm a Christian and God's will is, for me, the most important thing so I'm constantly seeking (and struggling) to put things in the proper perspective. I always try to remember that as much as I love music, life is much bigger than my little passions.

In light of the internet and downloading do you feel that fans are missing out on the record buying discovery/experience?

Probably. But with easy and immediate access to everything in the world via the internet, people have gained something too. Life is all about trade-offs and while I really value my experiences as a young music fan growing up in an analog world, I'm confident that music lovers have everything they need. Technology has allowed me to hear so many things that I almost certainly could not have heard without the web so I'm happy about it.

Do you think that success is your motivation and do you have a preset gameplan for your music/the band?

The game-plan is always changing but, for me, there is one constant; make good songs. There's an old adage that says "predictions are difficult, especially about the future" and anticipating what may or may not happen is impossible and, generally, a waste of time (I say this after more than 20 years on the inside). But, I have faith that a really good song has endless potential for success and almost always finds a place of recognition, even if it's a humble one. So therefore, that's what I focus on.

DJ’s are now as famous as a lot of the bands they play, what are your views on this and do you think it’s deserved?

 Really good and deserving things are best appreciated after a fair amount of time has passed. I would imagine that many people who are seen as talented, important or successful right now may not be regarded as such when future generations review their work.

To date, what has been your most memorable gig (either as a performer or as a fan)?

 In Ugly Duckling, we had our first really good show (we'd been performing for 5 years) at Fabric in London around 2000. The audience was going nuts and it was like being in a movie about a popular band. Afterwards, someone told me the crowd's enthusiasm was fuelled by massive drug consumption and while that may be true, it was still a surreal experience.

How do you overcome pre-gig nerves (if you get them)?

 When I hear good music banging out of the stage monitor speakers, I feel comfortable and safe.

When did you last write something?

 I wrote a little bit yesterday on the way to a gig but it's been a few weeks since I've really had a chance to write. We've (The Allergies) have been so focused on our live show that everything else has taken a backseat for a bit.

Have you ever reached a point where you’ve thought about throwing the towel in and walking away (and if so, what persuaded you otherwise)?

Absolutely. But as Peter said to Christ when Jesus asked him if the apostles were going to abandon him, "Lord, to whom would we go?" I have been frustrated with my career situation many a time but, in the end, I don't know what else I would do.

What are your views on electronics muscling in and replacing live instuments during recording?

Whatever works to rock a crowd. With The Allergies, we combine DJ elements with live music so, obviously, we're all for it. I've watched a million live shows (both good and bad-mostly bad) and there's no one way to do it.

Lastly, thank you for your time. What made you agree to answer these questions?

I've got nothing better to do right now and I'm kind of hoping you can get me a job.

Scone Cash Players

As the Screw Turns’

Miami organ group, Scone Cash Players, have announced their new album, As The Screw Turns, out June 21st via Miami label: Flamingo Time / Mango Hill records - Distributed exclusively by Daptone Records.

Hammond organist and bandleader Adam Scone, also an original member of The Sugarman 3, came up with the idea for the album while traveling on the road with Sharon Jones on the Daptone Super Soul Revue tour in Europe. The album features Naomi Shelton and other renowned Daptone Family musicians. When they put the screws on you, you have to dig deep.

Pre-Order Now

Funk supergroup The New Mastersounds should need no introduction; in 2019 they celebrate 20 years as a band, with so many releases their own promotion agency has given up trying to keep count and an amount of live shows that only dedicated musicians who truly love their craft could withstand. 20 years together, yet NMS continue (somehow) to play with the enthusiasm and joy of teenagers.

Their newest single "Let’s Go Back" sets the stage for a collaboration between The New Mastersounds and vocalist Lamar Williams Jr. Written by NMS keyboardist Joe Tatton during a late night creative session Atlanta, the song draws influences from the swampy grooves of Lee Dorsey and The Meters, with lyrics testifying that it’s never too late to go back and ‘make things good again’. This feel-good track is the first digital single off the album "Shake It", due for release on Color Red Records on September 13th, 2019.

20 Questions You Didn’t Know You Wanted To Ask... Joe from Superbird


1. How would you best describe what you do to the uninitiated?

We are a peacock inspired music phenomena, a colourful pop-funk n’ roll power package, freshly delivered from the stork of love...


2. Where would you say you are with regard to your career right now?

Life seems to be taking us upwards! After bubbling in the sauce pot for quite some time, the lid seems to have finally blasted open.


3. Which song (not neccesarilly yours) best sums you/the band up and why?

Can I give you two answers? The song ‘Love Rollercoaster’ by the Ohio Players is an amazing funk-ky jam I think could fit beautifully in a Superbird set…. My other answer would be our tune ‘Cola Bottle Fizz’ - a not too dissimilar piece of raunchy pop music. ;)


4. Who would you say has been your biggest inspiration (musically or otherwise)?

It has to be Prince. He’s our man. Our inspiration. Our deity. He is God.


5. Is there anyone amongst your influences that you think would surprise people and why?

My personal heroes have always been the bold, daring and incredibly flamboyant: Prince, Bowie & Freddie Mercury.

All legends. I don’t think any of these would seem like a surprising influence…

But as a whole our collected influences range from classical music to hip-hop.

I don’t think it’s a surprise anymore for people to be extremely eclectic with musical taste. Personal taste is what defines a person.


6. What are you most proud of?

Superbirds’ consistent, persistent approach at releasing kick-ass tunes!


7. In the quest to get the music ‘out there’ have you ever done or agreed to anything you’ve later regretted?

There’s plenty of things regrettable - but it’s all part of the story right? The key to success is through failure. There’s no such thing as perfection - But striving for it can create something truly special…. But to answer properly, one or two many shows performed (under the influence) can be hella fun! But also disastrous.


8. What’s the most ridiculous request that’s been asked of you/the band?

Someone asked us for our liver on instagram… Then they topped it be requesting our pancreas.


9. What do you think is the secret to a good working relationship amongst musicians?

Utilizing each others skills in the right field.


10. If you could have played on one song (that you don’t), what would it be and why?

Probably a third-part guitar harmony in the monster solo of ‘Hotel California’


11. How do you make the balance between music and personal responsibilities?

More than often it merges into one thing of daily jobs tasks to complete. The personal responsibilities are bent in such a way to help further the music.


12. In light of the internet and downloading do you feel that fans are missing out on the record buying discovery/experience?

I think it’s a truly magical thing, the whole walking into a record shop, buying (and smelling) a fresh vinyl, even CD - and cassette!

But those days are in the past now. It fills me with great pride and confidence knowing that people are able to access our music and assets at the click of a button. Times have changed, and we are moving with the times. x


13. Do you think that success is your motivation and do you have a preset gameplan for your music/the band?

We’ve had a gameplan since day dot. Sure, some things have changed over the course, targets not hit, deadlines not met. But the general gameplan itself is playing out as we planned so far.


14. DJ’s are now as famous as a lot of the bands they play, what are your views on this and do you think it’s deserved?

I think it’s totally cool. DJ’s are as important to our music culture as much as musicians are. ‘DJ’ is an art form in itself.

They work wonders for musicians and bands alike.


15. To date, what has been your most memorable gig (either as a performer or as a fan)?

As a performer - it has to be when we unleashed Superbird for the first time in the Summer of 2018 at a soakin’ sweaty stuffed out bar in Shoreditch. The Lighthouse Bar & Club. A great eve.


16. How do you overcome pre-gig nerves (if you get them)?

By simply hitting that first chord and singing that first note. Everything from then on is a ball.


17. When did you last write something?

Today.


18. Have you ever reached a point where you’ve thought about throwing the towel in and walking away (and if so, what persuaded you otherwise)?

Never.


19. What are your views on electronics muscling in and replacing live instuments during recording?

I think they can be used really smartly in a way to flesh out the stage show, and as a way to bring some of the studio sounds to life.


20. Lastly, thank you for your time. What made you agree to answer these questions?

BECAUSE I FUCKIN’ LOVE YA DUN I?! XXX


Night Trains, the rare groove and mod vibes outfit with dance sensibilities founded in 1987 by bassist, producer and DJ Hugh Brooker and part of the first wave of acts to sign to Acid Jazz Records, is back with a new single on double-sider 45 via Légère Recordings!

The two sides of this 45 are from very different polarities of musical genres and styles, but still sharing a similar universal message and sentiment. Side A’s “Don’t Want To Know” gives an old John Martyn folk ballad an uptempo positive summery twist, with the magnificent Najwa handling vocal duties. On the flip of the 45 is “Do Anything You Wanna Do”, a Night Trains rework of the timeless classic by Eddie & The Hot Rods. This tune was originally released digitally via Acid Jazz in 2017 but Légère label boss Helmut loved it so much he wanted it on wax. The track was co-produced by James Johnstone (Pigbag) and features the sublime vocals of Jennie Bellestar (The Belle Stars). The digital release does not include this tune but instead has the instrumental version of A-side’s “Don’t Want To Know”.

The story of the Smuggler Brothers starts in Palermo, the principal town of Sicily, in late 2011.

Founded by three friends, musicians active in the fertile underground music scene of the city, the band aims to experiment new artistic directions, combining a diverse set of influences ranging from Italian soundtracks and Library music from the ‘60s and ‘70s to African-American music, with groove as the core essence of the band. From the initial nucleus, the band evolved soon into an 8-pieces combo.

Following an exciting period spent rehearsing and honing their sound, the Smuggler Brothers started an intense live activity, gaining the enthusiastic support of the local scene. In 2015 the band felt it was time to record their music – their self-titled debut album was recorded at Zeit Studio in Palermo, 15-tracks that were pressed on limited edition vinyl and released via Tone Deaf Records. Shortly after their album tour, the band suffered a period of instability – the departure of some players slowly weakened the structure of the group, forcing the remaining band members to interrupt the live activity and reflect on the future of the project.

2017 sees the band coming back to life and entering a new phase – with a renewed 5-element structure and a clear plan, the group started to work on new music and perform on stage again. At the end of the same year the Milan-based record label Schema Records decided to put Smuggler Brothers under a contract. The label interest and the artistic direction of Massimo Martellotta (Calibro 35) pushed the band forward: in October 2018 the Sicilian brothers eventually landed in Milan to record at Schema Records’ Blue Spirit Studio. Their second album will be published by Schema Records in 2019.

American DJ, producer & singer-songwriter Eric Boss presents his debut solo album "A Modern Love", an effervescent collection of raw funk, sweet soul, west coast vibes and classic hip hop, produced by Björn Wagner and Steffen Wagner (The Mighty Mocambos / Bacao Rhythm & Steel Band).

"A Modern Love" has all the ingredients of a future classic. High-profile guests? Check: with Gift Of Gab (Blackalicious) rapping on "I Wanna Ride", a track with more bounce than a lowrider chevy on Santa Monica boulevard, and soul siren Gizelle Smith featuring on "Spiders", a spooky number that will get you jumping out of your seat like you've been attacked by giant 8-legged arachnids. Need some dancefloor action? "Get Next To You" gets down to serious bizniz with crisp drums and a catchy hook guaranteed to get the party started. Something for lovers? We've got it covered with "Is It Love", where Eric waxes lyrical about his sweetheart over a honey-drenched soul beat. From reggae-flavored vibes being served in inspirational number "Your Life Is Up to You" to the slow-burning grooves of "Merry Jane" which features singer Ishtar, the 10 tunes on "A Modern Love" all attest to Eric Boss' talent and versatility. 

It’s here! Soul On The Corner is officially out and you can grab a copy from the Acid Jazz website now.

Following last year’s acclaimed Jazz On The Corner compilation 2019 again sees Martin Freeman team up with Acid Jazz’s renowned head honcho Eddie Piller to present a veritable and personal collection of tracks. Compiled from the pair’s personal favourites, be it hearing on the radio, word of mouth or Dj-ing – Soul On The Corner represents the entire gamut of soul from the sixties and seventies right up to the present as illustrated by the likes of Tommy McGhee and the Acid Jazz recent signee Laville.

Follow the official Soul On The Corner playlist here.

London-based soul legends The Brand New Heavies mark their return to spiritual home Acid Jazz Records with their new single Getaway featuring the voice of N’Dea Davenport.

Led by founder members (songwriters and multi-instrumentalists) Andrew Levy and Simon Bartholomew, were at the head of emergent Acid Jazz movement alongside the likes of Young Disciples and Jamiroquai. Their debut single, the celebrated club classic Got To Give found a home at Chrysalis Records before the band signed to Acid Jazz Records in 1989 quickly releasing the self-titled debut album which was then picked up in the US by legendary hip-hop label Delicious Vinyl.

2019 sees The Brand New Heavies return with Getaway, featuring long-time collaborative associate and vocalist N’Dea Davenport it also sees them return to their spiritual home having resigned to Acid Jazz Records. Lustrous soul grooves coupled with Davenport’s distinctive vocals provides a remarkable introduction to what is the next chapter in the evolution of The Brand New Heavies, not only an emphatic reminder of their artistry but an insight into future endeavours on the eve of a new album…


20 Questions You Didn't Know You Wanted To Ask... Ian from The King Rooster


1. How would you best describe what you do to the uninitiated?

Heavy , Hard ,Raw , Real FUNK

No not like 80's cameo or late kool and the gang , id say proper dirt


2. Where would you say you are with regard to your career right now?


musically i would say has progressed fairly nicely and got to a position where my writing has got half decent and i know , have worked with , can call on, enough of the right musicians to make whats in my head into records. financially tho i would say like a tea making apprentice still


3. Which song (not neccesarilly yours) best sums you/the band up and why?

of ours , either swamp donkey or on the corner . hard heavy raw and manic . not ours , probably Doin the thing by the lefties soul connection , coz its just proper funk with the same 4 ingredients


4. Who would you say has been your biggest inspiration (musically or otherwise)?

wow , hard to answer musically, bass playing wise i would say Ernie mckone , for the amount of stuff he was involved with etc when i first got into that "acid jazz" era scene and his pulsating bass lines. jonathan maron, his bass work on the Repercussions Earth and heaven album made me realise i need to up my game and is probably some of the best bass work i've ever listened to. also Dale davies for sheer groove his trills and feel etc (check out esperanto ` - all good things and see what i mean).


5. Is there anyone amongst your influences that you think would surprise people and why?

ha , when i was a kid , being in my dads car meant being subjected to his meat loaf & queen tapes , both obviously had a lasting impression as i still secretly (well not secret any more lol) like them and they are what made me want to play bass in the first place , i used to zone out and tune into the bass lines , listening to john deacons melodic bass lines weaving around the vocal lines , pure class , but the one that really did it for me and still does to this day is the way the bass comes in on meatloafs 2 out of 3 aint bad , the 2 intro notes so simple but the slide into the 3rd note was a serious moment at 10 / 11 years old and still is today


6. What are you most proud of?

getting 45's out on detroits funknight records (along side the likes of will sessions etc) playing some of the venues i used to go to way back to watch bands and think wow would be sooo cool to play here (jazz cafe has to be the top one for me especially when the getup played it with the legendary Linda Muriel (acid jazz legend) doing vocals for us) that was cool

and the king rooster album, from a plan in my head to the finished article in a short space of time and sounding and looking pretty good


7. In the quest to get the music ‘out there’ have you ever done or agreed to anything you’ve later regretted?

NO - coz i know what i want things to be like and sound like and if a label , for example, start the old "yeah can we just do that or this" er , if it aint a good idea then my answer is "NO" they either like and believe in what your doing or if they dont and wanna change things then , er fuck off.


8. What’s the most ridiculous request that’s been asked of you/the band?

Actually havent been asked anything ridiculous to be honest , apart from a few "promoters" and "djs" who noone has ever heard of wanting me to send them every release on vinyl for free coz they can make things happen for me and the band . i try not to be rude , mood depending , might just email a reply telling them the price or directing them to shops who stock/ juno/ the labels to buy direct.


9. What do you think is the secret to a good working relationship amongst musicians?

work with the musicians you want to and respect their ideas , if someone has a vision try get into that and do what they want rather than pissing all over it with your own ideas.if its your own project then get people in who you know sound like the sound you want. be fair , if you all do the gigs , the travel and the work then split the dough. there are a few bands ive heard of where the kinda main person takes x amount and the rest have to share a tiny amount between them , peop;e talk bout shit like that. most people ive met and worked with along the way are really nice and cool


10. If you could have played on one song (that you don’t), what would it be and why?

hmmmm , so many to choose from er maybe I NEED YOUR LOVE - JOY (coz its one of my fave bass lines ever) , Actually FORGET ME NOTS - PATRICE RUSHEN (amazing b-line and the amount of radio plays that gets would make life easier) or JOHN HOLT - YOU BABY (as its one of the best tunes ever written)


11. How do you make the balance between music and personal responsibilities?

I dont lol , the music does seem to take over , particulaly when ideas are flowing , no matter what im doing or where then ill be constantly humming ideas into phone or dictaphone , writing lyrics and arrangements down , running off upstairs to grab bass to work out a bass line then next thing i know im getting moaned at cos a couple mins turn into a couple hours then , all the little jobs round the the house havent been done blah blah , its all consuming, but hey thats music


12. In light of the internet and downloading do you feel that fans are missing out on the record buying discovery/experience?

without a doubt , plus the money for musicians is a bit shit , particularly spotify , i dont even use it for that reason , my kids tho , thats all they know , itunes is ok as at least most of the money goes to the artist but yeah the buying experience can never be enjoyed by the kids coming through, that joy felt when a record thats been on your wants list , in your actual tattered and torn notebook , turns up in the racks after 6 years of searching , all the records you used to buy had memories attached . even getting the records now is kinda instant with places like juno so , although amazing , still not as fun. but the record shops are coming back in a good way , soul proprieters in brixton is a proper shop , like the old days , stacked with enough to financially destroy you on every visit. just how it should be.its a shame.


13. Do you think that success is your motivation and do you have a preset gameplan for your music/the band?

my motivation is making the kind of music i wanna make, if that every brings success (which is looking less and less likely as time ticks away lol) & financial reward that would be cool and a bonus , so far it hasnt and doubt it ever will. the game plan for The King Rooster is to keep turning out heavy hard raw real funk. get it out there on wax for the small minority of proper funk heads and ourselves to enjoy


14. DJ’s are now as famous as a lot of the bands they play, what are your views on this and do you think it’s deserved?

good old skool djs with turntables and wax, in my opinion are just as skilled and deserving as musicians , the turntables are their instrument. they have learned their craft. but the ones with the computers with the software that beat matches and mixes for them should probably just fuck off i guess. mind u i wouldnt mind a job where u get paid mega money for doing nothing.


15. To date, what has been your most memorable gig (either as a performer or as a fan)?

as a fan either James mason (sometime in the nineties if my memory serves me correctly, a monday niight at the jazz cafe) he played the whole classic rhythm of life album and it was mesmerising. or The new fast automatic daffodils at brixton academy , who were one of the lesser known manchester indie bands for some bizzare reason because they were fucking brilliant and live completely insane.

As a performer playing the jazz cafe with the getup with Linda Muriel (yes the acid jazz legend) on vocals , also the saint paul soul jazz festival gigs in south of france (put on by Fabrice / Stefan Garcia)that both the Getup and The King Rooster have played are always memerable due to the place , the people , the bands and just how you are looked after and appreciated while you are there , brilliant.


16. How do you overcome pre-gig nerves (if you get them)?

Dont really get them , but on the odd occasion a bit of indie style shoe gazing for a couple of tunes and the thought that thank fuck im not a singer does the trick.


17. When did you last write something?

last night,yesterday,today , all the time . it never reallt stops , alwys getting ideas popping into my head , humming bass lines into phone recorder, grabbing bass to work out a line that popped into my head, scribbling lyrics and arrangement ideas down , working on demos, it really never stops.


18. Have you ever reached a point where you’ve thought about throwing the towel in and walking away (and if so, what persuaded you otherwise)?

No because i do it coz i just wanna make the music i wanna make, not to get an army of fans or a garage load of ferraris tho both of those would be a nice bonus, i cant imagine ever stopping as its just part of who i am. i dont get disillusioned because im way past the stage where i think something big might happen etc i quickly realised that proper FUNK dont make paper lol


19. What are your views on electronics muscling in and replacing live instruments during recording?

Well in real funk that doesnt happen anyway coz it just cant , mind u im not against it if its needed , some styles of music no doubt are better for it. but if an artist is doing it to cut costs , ie getting the keys player to bang out a bass line or whatever to save a bit of dough then thats just stupid coz the music suffers and i cant understand why you would sacrafice the end product like that.


20. Lastly, thank you for your time. What made you agree to answer these questions?

cool , no probs . well you dig proper music , the questions were cool and i hardley ever get asked to do this sort of thing so its kinda nice to get a lil bit of recognition for the music that myself and the band are putting out because theres years of hard graft behind it . cheers

Australia’s hardest hitting Hammond Organ trio Cookin’ On 3 Burners drop a brand new 45 of scientific soul sonics taken from their latest album “Lab Experiments Vol. 2” released in 2018.

Boasting two Burners vocal cuts, this 45 comes hot off the platter direct from the Cookin’ kitchen where it was scorched onto analogue tape. On side A Kylie Auldist shines bright on melodic soul chugger “One Of The Ones”, the perfect blend of sweetness and heat. Kylie’s not one of the millions she’s One of the Ones stepping out and claiming what’s hers. Side B’s “Force Of Nature”sees Fallon Williams on the warpath, speaking truths and giving notice to all those trap talking politicians – watch out!

How hot can it be in the Arctic? Take a listen to "Togetherings", the fourth studio album by Finland-based rhythm music combo The Blassics, to find out. This album brings to your ears a sizzling collection of musical treats 9-piece ensemble The Blassics has achieved through the delicate art of listening to one another. Including both planned compositions such as "Hagerun Geleba" and completely improvised material like "Why is the Chicken Running?", new album "Togetherings" showcases the band's natural chemistry and reminds us about the important role of music in cultivating joy, healing and hanging out.

Entirely composed by The Blassics, the 6 tracks of "Togetherings" weave together a vibrant palette of afro-funk, Ethio-jazz and hypnotic grooves that all extend beyond radio-friendly limits and industry standards. Recorded live on 8-track tape at Odd Funk Records analog studio in Hämeenlinna, Finland, the album delves into the roots of deep and spacey funk, afro and jazz while carefully applying Arctic seasoning and crispy tape sound. Mastering by Jukka Sarapää at Timmion gives this Blassical music collection the ultimate audio icing.